Designing an English Country Kitchen

Designing an English Country Kitchen

Wherever you are in the world, there are certain interior design classics which will always be a hit. The English country kitchen is one of these home design staples. Charming, timeless and homely, this is the perfect family kitchen, and is surprisingly easy to recreate. If you want to give your home an oasis of gorgeous English charm, read on to find out how you can achieve this look. Firstly, in English kitchens, wood is the predominant material. You won’t see a lot of sleek metal or glass cabinets here. Instead, opt for oaks, pines and walnuts for a truly traditional look. It’s best to continue the theme of the wood throughout the furniture, though a few mismatched statement pieces can look attractive, such as a vintage breakfast table. Make sure the wood isn’t too dark, or it will make the kitchen look smaller and less inviting. The colours in country kitchens tend to be muted pastels or earthy colours. If you want to keep it fairly neutral, go for ochres and olive greens, or for something lighter and cuter, macaroon-inspired pastels can look fantastic. Don’t go for the exact same shade throughout, and try to find variations on a couple of colours for something which looks more relaxed and filled with character. English country kitchens tend to focus on a large range style cooker. These tend to be double the size of normal stoves, so are fantastic for preparing a meal for the entire family when they’ve returned from their country walk. Lots of these kitchens might also have a fireplace on one wall, but if yours doesn’t turn it into a focal point with a cabinet topped with some interesting trinkets and vintage ornaments. When it comes to flooring, steer clear of lino and instead go for solid wooden flooring or fired terracotta tiles. These should have a matt finish to prevent them from being slippery. Don’t worry if you’ve chosen to include green in your colour scheme, as the reddish-brown terracotta tiles go surprisingly well with earthy, muted greens. If you have space, a breakfast table surrounded with dining chairs can be a splendid addition to the kitchen. These chairs don’t necessarily need to match, but you could link them together with some pretty matching cushions which tie in with the colour scheme. Always include fresh flowers or potted herbs in your kitchen as a finishing touch, and don’t forget to make it really cosy and homely with lots of pictures of the family and children’s...

Three Reasons To Use An Accident Claims Company

Three Reasons To Use An Accident Claims Company

When you get in an accident, you want the very best for your claim. You want to make sure that your claim is taken seriously, that it moves through the process and the channels quickly, and that, in the end, you get what you deserve for your inconvenience and injury. It’s also a good idea to get a highly effective solicitor to represent you, and this is where an accident claims company comes into play. An accident claims company, also known as either a personal injury management company or an accident management company, will sell your personal injury claim to a practicing solicitor. Here are the three reasons to use such a company. You Will Have the Greatest Possible Chance of Winning Your Claim When you’ve been injured in a car accident, you want damages paid out to you because you have medical bills, emotional trauma, and suffering. Unfortunately, getting this compensation paid out to you is not automatic, which is why you require a good solicitor on your side. One of the best reasons to rely on an accident management company is to find a good solicitor. Both expertise and knowhow are crucial in the solicitor that you pick to handle your personal injury claim. A good solicitor your accident management company finds will pay money to handle your claim, which is an indication of dedication. Optimize the Compensation Coming to You As the victim, chances are high that you’re not a trained solicitor who knows exactly what to do to maximize your compensation. As noted by the team at NoWinNoFeeCo.co.uk, that’s why having a good solicitor is so important. Your solicitor will know all about how much to claim for your injuries and the various kinds of financial loss to claim for said injuries. Your accident claims company is there to make sure you get a solicitor who can get you all that you deserve. Since your solicitor is your main representative in the claims process, it is extremely important that you can trust him to do a good job. Good Communication With Your Lawyer Communication is at the heart of every good and effective relationship, including the one you have with your solicitor. When an accident management company puts you in touch with a solicitor, you’ll be able to determine if you and he enjoy open and fluid communication. If not, you can simply get a better solicitor from your company. Communication is key, as you’re going through your claims process because you need to get updates from your solicitor. In addition, you need to be able to ask him questions about the process whenever you want. These are the three reasons to use an accident claims company when you’ve been injured in a car accident. Such a company exists to ensure that you get put in touch with a solicitor who’ll take your claim seriously and get you the compensation that you deserve for your pain and suffering. Of course, you can also get in touch with a solicitor yourself, but you may not know which ones are the better ones to handle your...

What it Means to Fly the American Flag

What it Means to Fly the American Flag

Elizabeth “Betsy” Ross lived in a simple lovely Federal home at 239 Arch St. in Philadelphia. Legend has it that George Washington commissioned Ms. Ross to sew the first American Flag from a design he provided. Betsy certainly lived near all the action in those days, but historians now believe that her flag involvement was made-up by a grandson. The Continental Congress meeting up the street recorded that Francis Hopkinson of New Jersey designed the flag. And, we cannot ignore its similarity to the East India Company flag with horizontal red stripes and a Union Jack in the upper left. It did not take much effort to replace the Union Jack with a circle of stars on a field of blue. Whatever the origin, the American Flag began to take on its symbolic character in the War for Independence. We fly the flag for many reasons. Symbolic Meaning The American Flag is a reminder of origins. Following traditions of heraldry, the red stripes represent valor and bravery while the white stripes suggest innocence. The stars represent each of the States in the Union against a blue that represents vigilance and perseverance. These interpretations are confirmed in the records of the Secretary of the Continental Congress. Military Meaning The American Flag is captured in many paintings and drawings from the period of the Revolutionary War. It is portrayed standing in the corner of what would be called Independence Hall, and it flies over Washington’s troops as they cross the Delaware. Perhaps more important, Francis Scott Key reported that “the flag was still there” throughout the British attack on Fort McHenry. We fly the American Flag to salute such memories and similar moments throughout our military history. We fly it to honor victories, to defy aggression, and to honor our dead. We fly the flag with emotion, sentiment, and goodwill. Community Meaning Flying the flag unifies Americans. Wherever and whenever the flag flies, we share a common reaction. It means at least the same to us all and sometimes more to some. We expect the flag to fly at public events. We fly the flag ourselves to honor great significant events: holidays, parades, anniversaries. In moments of national distress or natural catastrophe, we fly the flag as a refuge and unifying force. Display Meaning There is an etiquette to flying the flag, a code we all seem to understand. For example, we fly the flag at half-mast on the President’s orders to honor the passing of major figures. Flags draping coffins are folded precisely in a ritual that moves everyone present. We fly or post flags according to code in the presence of other flags, on stages or raised platforms, and on parade. Maintenance Meaning We fly the American Flag and continue its symbolic powers by caring for it in minute detail. We follow rules on its display at night, in bad weather, indoors and out. We fly the flag with sensitivity and care. In doing so, we continue its specialness. We fly the American Flag with pride. We fly it to honor it and to invoke all that it means and symbolizes. We invoke the best of history and identify ourselves as partners in the American tradition and...

The Journey of William Gollings through the World of Western Art

The Journey of William Gollings through the World of Western Art

William Gollings was an American artist who has earned a great deal of fame for his western artwork. Unlike many other artists whose western artwork was based on their observations of the lifestyle and people of America’s west, William Gollings made paintings based on his own experience as a cowboy. Gollings was born in 1878 in Idaho, USA. His parents sent him to Michigan for the purpose of receiving his education. Following his interest in arts, William Gollings enrolled in the Academy of Fine Arts, Chicago where he spent two years polishing his artistic skills. He began his career as a professional artist in the early twentieth century. The cowboy was inspired by another fellow American painter of the twentieth century, Fredrick Remington. Both artists shared the passion for painting America’s western culture. Initially, however, William Gollings used to sell his original paintings to a mid-western publishing company in order to generate finances for affording his art school education. The publishing company used his artwork in calendars and post cards and also created lithographs. Today, the old calendars, lithographs and post cards bearing Gollings’ impressive early work are extremely valuable, with art museums ready to pay a large sum to purchase them. William Gollings gave up his life as a cowboy in 1909 when he decided to stay permanently in Wyoming. He built a studio in order to paint in a proper environment. He combined his inborn skills with his art education to create paintings of cowboys, American Indians and the western lifestyle of America. He used oil paints as well as watercolors for his paintings. Moreover, Gollings also created several sketches. Gollings also learned from another distinguished artist, Joseph Henry Sharp, an American painter who has made priceless contributions to western art. Both the artists were on friendly terms with each other. William Gollings received valuable tips regarding the use of colors from his skillful friend. Sharp also advised William Gollings about imparting an impressionistic character to his paintings. Gollings had the honor of meeting various acclaimed artists of his time, including Charles Marion Russell, Will James, Edward Borein and several others, all famous for their extraordinary western art. William Gollings collected tips and pieces of advice from the artists he held in high esteem. By 1912, he had become an accomplished painter himself, creating countless masterpieces. William Gollings passed away in 1932 in Sheridan Wyoming, the same place where he began his professional career. Within fifty-four years of his life, Gollings had achieved enough to be deemed as one of the most remarkable artists of the history of America’s west. He has left behind a legacy of exceptional western artwork, most of which is now exhibited in several art organizations, including the National Museum of Wildlife Art and the Buffalo Bill Historical Center, Wyoming. Among some of his most famous cowboy depictions are, “Montana Cowboy”, “The Trail Boss”, “Range Riders” and “Turkey in the Straw”. Many of his paintings also depict the Native American Indians. “The Hunter”, “The Revenge” and “When the Geese Fly North” are some of the most famous paintings of American Indians made by William Gollings. Image Source: http://www.cottoneauctions.com A quick note about our guest author: James Vasanth writes a blog on ScottsDale Art Auction, about William Gollings and connecting the dots between online and offline. Visit...